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Setup your Chocolatey repository in Azure - Part 2

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In the first part of this series we've seen how we can have our chocolatey repository hosted on Azure, we can start pushing and using some packages from the server.

To create and publish packages you’ll need nuget executable on your workstation. You can download the nuget.exe from the link https://www.nuget.org/nuget.exe.

The next step is to create a nuspec file with the details of the package you want to create. In this sample I’ll create a nuspec file for creating a package for the Foxe XML editor and push that to the chocolatey repository.

Create a folder
foxe-package in your workstation and add the nuspec file with the contents as given below.

xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
   
        Foxe
        1.2.0
        Firstobject's free XML editor for Windows
        Firstobject
        Firstobject
        false
        Free XML editor for Windows
       
          It loads big files (multi-megabyte) fast and lets you format XML and edit HTML and any loosely formed XML or other markup.
          The tree view is editable and customizable for useful navigation.
       
        en-US
        XML, Windows, Free, Tools, Editor       
   

Setup your Chocolatey repository in Azure - Part 1

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Chocolatey is a package manager for Windows designed to be a decentralized framework for quickly installing applications and tools that you need. Chocolatey is actually built on top of the NuGet package system, but it is designed to fill a different need. Chocolatey wraps up applications and other executables and makes it easy to install them on your computer.

The goal behind this post is to successfully setup up a Chocolatey repository in Azure websites to distribute software easily throughout the network. You can use the same approach to host a repository on premises, by choosing a deployment
option not to host on Azure but on local IIS.

Follow the steps in the given order to complete the process.
Open Visual Studio and create an empty project (ASP.NET Web Application)

In the package manager console, type the cmdlet Install-Package Nuget.Server to install the NuGet server package

Alternatively you can use the Manage Nuget Packages options by right clicking the project.

After successful installation, your project structure should look like

Open the added Web.config file and change the following values in the appSettings section. Make sure that your package path is not...(Read whole news on source site)

Windows 10 RTM Upgrade and Driver Update Issues

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True to full Murphy form, my upgrade to Windows 10 on my MacBook Pro Bootcamp partition went anything but smoothly. When I got my new machine a few weeks back I installed the Windows 10 Preview on it – specifically build 10162. The install through the Bootcamp manager went smoothly without any issues whatsoever and Windows 10 had been running nicely on it. The Mac makes for a pretty damn nice and fast Windows machine – it’s quite a bit speedier than a similarly configured Dell XPS 15 I’ve been using. The Mac is partitioned half and half for
Windows and Mac and running the Bootcamp partition from the Mac via Parallels and it all works pretty well. I’ve been spending most of my time in the native Windows partition recently and using Windows 10. I’ve been pleased with Windows 10 – it seems Microsoft has finally found some polish instead of the cartoonish interfaces they’ve been cultivating since Windows Vista through Windows 8. For the most part the OS seems very smooth in terms of operation and the overall feel of the shell. I really like the way the Windows Chrome looks – which actually makes even legacy...(Read whole news on source site)

Windows 10 SDK With New Windows Performance Toolkit Available!

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Originally posted on: http://geekswithblogs.net/akraus1/archive/2015/07/31/166002.aspxIt has been a long wait to finally get the new version of the new Windows Performance Toolkit. I had not much time to test the betas since until now managed call stack resolution was not working. WPT for Windows 10 makes some nice progress which you can download here. Click on the Download Standalone SDK and run it. Then uncheck everything except Windows Performance Toolkit and it will install on your machine within minutes. If you download the complete Windows 10 SDK you are not downloading 170MB but several GB.
  Management Summary Graphs are more readable. Graphs with short spikes are much better rendered without the need to zoom into to see them. Colors for graphs are changeable (finally). Filtering can be undone now in the context menu. Quick Search in all tables. Symbol load dialog was improved. You can configure your own stack tag files in Trace Properties. No new Graph Types (at least with...(Read whole news on source site)

How to force your system to start downloading #Windows 10 update?

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Many of you asked me, why you didn’t receive the Windows 10 upgrade notification even though you reserved your free copy of Windows 10. Please note that, this is going in phases and you will get it soon. Might be, your update files already started downloading. If you can not wait and want to force the same, you can do so by following some simple steps. Continue reading to know more.   If you are using a system with genuine Windows 7 or Windows 8.x, you should start receiving the update files over air or already upgraded your
system for free. In case you didn’t receive it yet and the “Get Windows 10” app still showing you “Thank you for reserving your free upgrade. …. OK, notify me when ready” message as shown below, no need to worry about. You can either wait or force a upgrade.  Go to control panel –> Windows Update screen and if you are seeing the following screen, that means, your update is not yet ready to download.  For a cleaner upgrade, go to your Windows installation directory. You will see a folder name “SoftwareDistribuition”. Inside this, another folder is present named “Download”. Go up...(Read whole news on source site)

Roaming Extension Manager: Control and Consistency down to the last Extension

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On July 28th, we released Roaming Extension Manager, an extension that will help you better manage your Visual Studio extensions across multiple machines. Hold the applause! For those of you who are unfamiliar, the Roaming Extension Manager “roams” your list of extensions, so now when you are setting up a new development environment or simply trying to push a few extensions from one machine to another, you don’t have to remember the names of the extensions or take screen shots. Instead, we provide you with a list displaying all of your extensions installed across all of your environments and
allow you to download directly from that list. How does this actually work? We create a cloud based Roaming List that tracks the extensions you have installed across all of your Visual Studio development environments looking just like this: Extensions in your Roaming List can be in 3 different statuses. At the top of the list shown in the above screenshot you see, Roamed Extensions . These are extensions that are set to be roamed, but have not yet been downloaded onto this machine. In other words, these extensions are being roamed from another machine, and are available for download...(Read whole news on source site)

How to Sync Scheduler .NET with Outlook Calendar

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We are glad to share another tutorial demonstrating excellent binding cabalilities of DHTMLX Scheduler .NET. It can now be syncronized with Outlook calendars, using Microsoft Live Account. We've prepared this detailed tutorial that explains how to implement an event calendar in ASP.NET MVC5 that uses Outlook Calendar as data source, without using Scheduler .NET database. To enable syncronization of Scheduler .NET calendar events with Outlook, we used Outlook API and REST.   To proceed with the tutorial you will have to use Visual Studio 2013. The provided code is valid both for ASP.NET MVC5 and MVC4 applications. See also tutorial how to
syncronize DHTMLX Scheduler .NET with Google Calendar. If it is the first time you'd like to use our scheduling component for your .NET application, see installation instructions here. You can also get a 30 days evaluation license with free technical support and access to our online ticket system. All you have to do is to request evaluation license here....(Read whole news on source site)

RavenDB On Linux–Status Update

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Several months ago we decided to ramp up the RavenDB on Linux migration effort, and hired a full time developer to do just that. We started this with great hopes, mostly because we were able to get Voron to run on Linux in a reasonable amount of time. But RavenDB is several orders of magnitude bigger than Voron, and we run into a lot more complexities along the way. In particular, and I am not quite sure how to put it nicely, the entire environment is pretty unstable. Our target was Mono – 4.3.0, MonoDevelop 5.10 and Ubuntu
14.04. And it takes really no effort at all to break pretty much everything there. For example, SLEEP_DURATION_BEFORE_ABORT will, if you are running inside a debugger, or just running GC, sometimes, it will intentionally crash if certain operations takes longer than 200ms. But in general, it feels like Mono just isn’t nearly stable enough for a production platform. Sometimes it would work fine, other time, you get horrible crashes in the process that required us to debug the mono runtime to figure out what is going on. Sometimes it was us doing stupid things, other times it was real bugs...(Read whole news on source site)

The Morning Brew #1915

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Information Doing Terrible Things To Your Code – Jeff Atwood What is DNX? – Clive Tong Debugging .NET Native Windows Universal Apps – Andrew B Hall Universal Windows apps in .NET – Lucian Wischik Visual Studio Customer Feedback Channels – The Visual Studio Blog – Kevin Lane Disable Prefer 32 bit – Rory Primrose The […]

Product Review- Stellar OLM to PST Converter

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Email is the priority for professional work and Outlook is the priority of an email. Being a very secure email client with both Windows and Mac Operating System support, MS Outlook becomes the requirement of professional world all across the world. As both operating systems are very popular, it is often required to convert MS Outlook Mac file (OLM) to MS Outlook Windows file (PST). It might be possible that you are still looking for a tool that can help you to migrate your Mac Outlook mail
to Windows Outlook mail. Stellar OLM to PST Converter is an efficient and reliable tool to convert OLM file format to PST file format. This amazing tool provides you a very easy to use environment that will make you more comfortable while using its features. It is comparatively faster and secure than other tools of its range. You will go through the process of searching, scanning previewing and at the end saving with this software. Now, I will explain you the process and capability of the software, but before that you have to copy the Mac...(Read whole news on source site)

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